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Virtual School Programs

 

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The Canadian Museum of History’s virtual school programs are live and interactive. They are available to groups learning either in the classroom or on personal computers.

All programs are delivered by a member of our staff, through an interactive presentation — typically via Zoom. However, if your school has special requirements, we would be happy to accommodate these by connecting with your classroom via Google Meet or Microsoft Teams.

The Canadian Museum of History is pleased to announce that the virtual school programs are now available to schools across Canada. Thanks in large part to the generosity of donors, the programs will be offered free of charge for the 2021–2022 school year.

First Peoples of the Northwest Coast

DESCRIPTION

Explore the iconic art and cultural practices of the First Peoples of the Northwest Coast in an engaging PowerPoint presentation of the Museum’s Grand Hall.

Introduce your students to the iconic art and cultural practices of the First Peoples of the Northwest Coast. As they discover the Museum’s spectacular Grand Hall, students will learn about the significance and symbolism of entrance poles, explore house fronts created by six different First Nations, and examine traditional objects such as woven baskets. This engaging program ends with a video presentation by award-winning Haida weaver Ariane Medley, who shares her personal connection to the Museum and its collection.

Native houses and totem poles
GRADES
ON Grades 3 to 6*
QC Cycles 2 and 3*
DATES TIMES
Beginning October 13, 2021 Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday, until 6 p.m. (ET)
DURATION GROUP SIZE
45 minutes 35 Students
LOCATION
Virtual interactive PowerPoint via Zoom, Google Meet or Microsoft Teams

*Best curriculum link is to increase students’ understanding of Indigenous cultural practices and the importance of the transmission of traditional knowledge. Together, these practices emphasize the strong connection Indigenous peoples have to the land.

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
Social Studies and Geography
HISTORICAL THINKING
Historical Perspective, Historical Significance

Teacher Overview

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Highlights of the Grand Hall

DESCRIPTION

Explore stunning works of art by Indigenous artists Alex Janvier and Bill Reid, and learn more about the traditions of the First Peoples of the Northwest Coast.

Take your students on an engaging interactive tour of the Museum’s Grand Hall. Your journey begins with a stop at artist Alex Janvier’s dazzling ceiling painting, Morning Star, followed by a look at the mythical figures crowded into Bill Reid’s sculptural masterpiece, the Spirit of Haida Gwaii. Students will also be introduced to the art and cultural practices of the First Peoples of the Northwest Coast, as they explore entrance poles and six Indigenous house fronts, and examine baskets and hats woven by Indigenous artists.

Native houses and totem poles
GRADES
ON Grades 3 to 6*
QC Cycles 2 and 3*
DATES TIMES
Beginning October 13, 2021 Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday, until 6 p.m. (ET)
DURATION GROUP SIZE
45 minutes 35 Students
LOCATION
Virtual interactive presentation via Zoom, Google Meet or Microsoft Teams

*Best curriculum link is to increase students’ understanding of Indigenous cultural practices and the importance of the transmission of traditional knowledge. Together, these practices emphasize the strong connection Indigenous peoples have to the land.

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
Social Studies and Geography
HISTORICAL THINKING
Historical Perspective, Historical Significance

Teacher Overview

Register Now

 

Confederation: There’s More to the Story

DESCRIPTION

Go beyond the textbook account through this virtual and interactive program.

This program will get your students thinking more broadly about Confederation, as they learn about key historical figures and gain insight into why Confederation was so controversial for many. What did Francophones and Maritimers think about Confederation? Why was a Father of Confederation, Thomas D’Arcy McGee, assassinated? Did women play a role in the process leading to the British North America Act? And how did some Indigenous peoples create a space for themselves within Confederation, despite being excluded from official negotiations? Get some answers with this virtual and interactive program.

A woman with photos and a painting
GRADES
ON Grades 7 to 12
QC Secondary 1 to 5
DATES TIMES
Beginning October 13, 2021 Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday, until 6 p.m. (ET)
DURATION GROUP SIZE
45 minutes 35 Students
LOCATION
Virtual interactive PowerPoint via Zoom, Google Meet or Microsoft Teams

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
Creating Canada, 1850–1890, The Formation of the Canadian Federation
HISTORICAL THINKING
Historical Perspective, Historical Significance , Primary Source Evidence

Teacher Overview

Register Now

 

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