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FROM BLACKSMITHS TO BLACKBOARDS

 
Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Atlantic Provinces

British Columbia and the Yukon

Ontario

Quebec

Saskatchewan

 

LESSON PLAN (Master) GRADES 8–10

Activity 1 - Complete the Online Quest Activity

General Goals of the Activity: Think historically, infer, organize, identify relationships, explore, retain information, examine, explore interactions, explore impacts (cultural, economic), and make connections between the past and the present.

Specific Goals of the activity

  1. Help students make connections between the villagers.
  2. Engage students in historical study using an interesting and engaging "game-like" environment.
  3. Help students extract useful information from general descriptions, and organize it for analysis.
  4. Help students understand individual and social biases and how they might impact a first-hand account.
  5. Help students connect their own time period with the past.
  6. Entice students to study the social structure of the village.

Themes and Competencies: (specific to curriculum; see provincial plans)

Subjects       

  • Tradespeople in 19th-century Quebec
  • Women in history
  • Hierarchical relationships and power
  • Tools and artifacts
  • Social history
  • Economic history
  • Interdependence in communities
  • Logic puzzles / problem solving

Duration of Activity: One to two 1-hour class periods

Required Equipment and Materials

  • Computer lab with one computer for every two to three students
  • Paper and pens

Instructions for Setup

  • Divide students into groups of two or three (depending on the size of the class and the number of computer's available for use).
  • Direct students to the following link; https://www.museedelhistoire.ca/tresors/village/index_e.asp
  • Each student group will then complete the quest activity, following the on-screen instructions.

Instructions for Use

  1. Students will enter the exhibition, and click "Quest".
  2. They will be presented with a mystery; to solve it they will need to complete ten tasks/quizzes.
  3. Students will work to complete the ten tasks, exploring the village and receiving clues to help them solve the mystery.
  4. After receiving all of their clues, students should be encouraged to talk in their group, and make an educated guess about how to solve the mystery. They must try at least once before being given the option to see the final answer.
  5. After they have completed the quest, assign each group the following questions to complete:
    1. What does this quest tell you about the nature of eye-witness accounts? Were the villagers always honest? Were they deliberately misleading?
    2. What types of questions would you have asked the villagers in order to get more information? What makes a good question?
    3. What are possible sources of tension between the villagers?
      • Read the tradesperson summaries for each person you talked to (go to the "village" tab and enter the buildings). What are some of the major issues Quebec tradespeople were facing during this time period?
      • Create a chart (see example below) to organize your information. Organize your information in a way that is useful for you.
      • What are some of the common problems for many of the trades? What problems are unique to one trade?

Trade

Problem

Trades with Similar Problems

Carpenter

- Furniture increasingly being made in large cities; factories

 

Teacher

 

 

Blacksmith

 

 

(etc.)

 

Activity 2 – Historical Questions and Research Activity

General Goals of the Activity: Examine continuity and change in Canadian society, explore interactions, explore the impact of technological innovation, think critically, inquire, verify, search, justify, participate, express opinions.

Specific Goals of the Activity

  1. Students should learn to develop a research question, conduct research, and develop a hypothesis/thesis statement.
  2. Teach students how to synthesize information and write a short report on their research.

Themes and Competencies: (specific to curriculum; see provincial plans)

Subjects       

  • Tradespeople in 19th-century Quebec
  • Women in history
  • Hierarchical relationships and power
  • Tools and artifacts
  • Social history
  • Economic history
  • Interdependence in communities
  • Logic puzzles / problem solving

Duration of Activity: One to two 1-hour class periods plus time at home for individual research

Required Equipment and Materials

  1. Computer Lab with one computer for every two to three students
  2. Topic List (written on the board, overhead projector, or a hand-out).

Instructions for Setup

  • Divide class into small groups (two to three students) depending on your class size.

Instructions for Use

  • Have each group choose a topic from the topic list (below).
  • Students will work in groups to develop an historical question based on their topic. It would be helpful to review with students what makes a good research question prior to starting this activity:
    • Narrow down the topic:  The topics on this list are broad and general, but they relate to this web module. Students will need to narrow them down to form a question to guide their research. This can be done using a brainstorming web (start with a key word, and have students think of words related to it). For example; the topic "Women in Quebec Villages" could generate words such as "teacher", "weaver", "farmer", "mother", "postmistress", etc.
    • Interesting questions could be: "What types of activities were done by women in the village?" or "How were women expected to behave in a 19th-century Quebec village?"
  • To help students get started, you may wish to take one topic from the list and work through the brainstorming and question-forming processes as a class.
  • After students have developed a question, ask them to investigate the village based on their question. Have them write down the information they find and discuss it as a group.
  • Once the groups have gathered information from the village, they will be asked to continue their research as individuals. Each student should work to formulate an answer to their research question (a thesis statement).
  • Using the village research as a base, students will need to find two additional information sources (book, document, internet site, etc.) on their topic.
  • Students should be given an appropriate amount of time outside class to work on their research questions. Once they have completed their research they will be asked to complete a three- to four-page report supporting the answer to their research question.

Topic List
In your group, choose one topic to focus on for this activity.

  1. Economic relationships
  2. Men and women's roles
  3. The role of a priest and religion in the community
  4. The status of different villagers based on occupation – social hierarchy
  5. The role of the general store – community and economic
  6. The role of the teacher and the schoolhouse
  7. The farmers wife: challenges and way of life
  8. Social activities and customs
  9. Technological changes, then and now
  10. Rural life, then and now

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