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Lifelines: Canada's East Coast Fisheries

Cross Currents
500 Generations of Aboriginal Fishing 
in Atlantic Canada
 
Sea Mammals
Cross Currents: 
500 Generations of Aboriginal Fishing in Atlantic Canada

 

Hunting Sea Mammals

Although the pursuit of sea mammals has continued from earliest times, the strongest archaeological evidence comes from cemetery sites in Newfoundland and Labrador. The 4,000-year-old Port au Choix and Twillingate sites in Newfoundland provide a rare glimpse into the lives and technologies of ancient sea-mammal hunters. Fixed-shaft, long-barbed spears made effective thrusting weapons. Toggling harpoons could be driven into the mammal and retrieved with an attached line. Ground slate and flaked stone made effective end blades for both fixed and detachable harpoons. Stylistic differences reflect differences in technology, regional cultural preferences and changes through time.


Maritime Archaic Hunters (7500-3200 B.P.) - 
 Deborah Schoenholz

Maritime Archaic Hunters
(7500-3200 B.P.)
(detail)

Deborah Schoenholz (1949- )
Ink and coloured pencil on mattboard
20 x 25 cm
( © Deborah Schoenholz )

Slate Bayonet - 
BlDn-2:153c - CD97-513-046

Slate Bayonet (Replica)
Cow Point, Grand Lake, New Brunswick
ca. 2000 B.C.
Length: 14 inches
Collection: Canadian Museum of Civilization, BlDn-2:153c


Design

 

 
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