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Research and Collections

Research and Collections

New Releases

 

1867

1867
Rebellion and Confederation

By Jean-François Lozier
November 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20307-2
124 pages, 66 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)

On July 1, 1867, Confederation was proclaimed. It marked the birth of today’s Canada and the culmination of a process that took nearly thirty years. 1867 – Rebellion and Confederation invites us to explore the journey of a society in transition and of people who fought, negotiated, and made compromises to better coexist.

By presenting the pivotal moments that led to the drafting of the British North America Act, the souvenir catalogue helps us recognize a legacy that is still echoed in our identity, our values and our institutions.

Fighting in Flanders

Fighting in Flanders
Gas. Mud. Memory.

By Mélanie Morin-Pelletier
November 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20306-5
108 pages, 61 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)

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From the opening movements of the First World War, most of Belgium was occupied by German forces. Fighting in Flanders explores how Canadians in Belgium had to adapt to the significant challenges ― from the first use of poison gas in the Second Battle of Ypres to the hellish mud of Passchendaele.

This souvenir catalogue highlights the famous poem In Flanders Fields by John McCrae and examines how Canadian and Belgian collective memories of this conflict have evolved over the last 100 years.

Canada’s Titanic

Canada’s Titanic
The Empress of Ireland

By John Willis
May 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20283-9
120 pages, 65 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)
Includes money-saving coupons

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One foggy night in May of 1914, two ships collided on the St. Lawrence River. The Empress of Ireland, with 1,477 souls aboard, sank in less than 15 minutes. An estimated 1,012 people perished.

This souvenir catalogue leads you through the atmosphere of celebration following the departure from Québec City, the confused encounter in the fog, the fateful collision with the collier and the desperate rush to escape the sinking vessel.

Artifacts from this once-splendid ocean liner and historical photos help bring to life stories of loss and rescue, despair and bravery that were all part of the greatest maritime disaster in Canadian history.

Petun to Wyandot

Petun to Wyandot
The Ontario Petun in the Sixteenth Century

By Charles Garrad
Edited by Jean-Luc Pilon and William Fox
May 2014, ISBN 978-0-7766-2144-9
Mercury Series, Archaeology Paper 174
628 pp., 51 illustrations, 17 x 24 cm, paperback
$89.95 (English only)
Trade orders: University of Ottawa Press

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Winner of the Ontario Archaeological Society’s 2014 Award for Excellence in Publishing

In Petun to Wyandot, Charles Garrad draws upon five decades of research to tell the turbulent history of the Wyandot tribe, the First Nation once known as the Petun. Beginning with the tribe’s first encounters with French explorer Samuel de Champlain in 1616 and extending to their eventual decline and dispersal, this book offers an account of this people from their own perspective and through the voices of the nations, tribes and individuals that surrounded them.

Through a cross-reference of views, including historical testimony from Jesuits priests, European explorers and fur traders, as well as neighbouring tribes and nations, Petun to Wyandot uncovers the Petun way of life by examining their culture, politics, trading arrangements and legends. Perhaps most valuable of all, it provides detailed archaeological evidence from the years of research undertaken by Garrad and his colleagues in the Petun Country, located in the Blue Mountains of Central Ontario. Along the way, the author provides a meticulous chronicle of the work by other historians and the theories regarding this little-understood people.

Old Man’s Playing Ground

Old Man’s Playing Ground
Gaming and Trade on the Plains/Plateau Frontier

By Gabriel Yanicki, with contributions from Allan Pard, Henry Holloway and Art Calling Last
April 2014, ISBN 978-0-7766-2138-8
Mercury Series, Archaeology Paper 173
271 pp., 81 illustrations, 17 x 24 cm, paperback
$65 (English only)
Trade orders: University of Ottawa Press

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When Hudson’s Bay Company surveyor Peter Fidler made contact with the Ktunaxa at the Gap of the Oldman River in the winter of 1792, his Piikáni guides brought him to the river’s namesake. These were the playing grounds where Napi, or Old Man, taught the various nations how to play a game as a way of making peace. In the centuries since, travellers, adventurers, and scholars have recorded several accounts of Old Man’s Playing Ground and of the hoop-and-arrow game that was played there.

Although it has been destroyed, much can be learned from an interdisciplinary study of Old Man’s Playing Ground. Oral traditions of the Piikáni and other First Nations of the Northwest Plains and Interior Plateau, together with textual records spanning centuries, show it to be a place of enduring cultural significance irrespective of its physical remains. Knowledge of the site and the hoop-and-arrow game played there is widespread, in keeping with historic and ethnographic accounts of multiple groups meeting and gambling at the site.

In this work, oral tradition, history, and ethnography are brought together with a geomorphic assessment of the playing ground’s most probable location — a floodplain scoured and rebuilt by floodwaters of the Oldman — and the archaeology of adjacent prehistoric campsite DlPo-8. Taken together, the locale can be understood as a nexus for cultural interaction and trade, through the medium of gambling and games, on the natural frontier between peoples of the Interior Plateau and Northwest Plains.

Witness

Witness
Canadian Art of the First World War

By Amber Lloydlangston and Laura Brandon
April 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20282-2
120 pages, 56 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)
Includes money-saving coupons

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From the massive canvases painted by official war artists to the tiny personal sketches by amateur soldiers, Witness – Canadian Art of the First World War examines how Canadians captured their First World War experiences in art, both at home and overseas.

This souvenir catalogue showcases 56 oil paintings, watercolours, prints and sketches by 52 artists in full colour. As they did when they were produced, these works help us understand and appreciate the unprecedented contributions and sacrifices Canadians made between 1914 and 1918.

Transformations

Transformations
A. Y. Jackson and Otto Dix

By Laura Brandon
April 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20281-5
120 pages, 50 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)
Includes money-saving coupons

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Group of Seven painter A. Y. Jackson and German artist Otto Dix incorporated the brutal horrors that they saw as soldiers on the First World War front lines into their later landscape art.

Transformations – A. Y. Jackson and Otto Dix shows how the two artists drew on memories of the physical destruction they witnessed at the front to create artworks that mourned the conflict’s consequences and reflected the post-war evolution of Canadian and German national identity.

Arranged chronologically into five sections, from their early years to their deaths, this souvenir catalogue traces the impact of the First World War on both artists’ careers. It includes 44 full-colour images of landscape paintings, drawings and prints, some never before seen in Canada.

The Grand Hall

The Grand Hall
First Peoples of Canada’s Northwest Coast

By Leslie Tepper
March 2014, ISBN 978-0-660-20279-2
108 pages, 55 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)
Includes money-saving coupons

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Explore the Aboriginal cultures of Canada’s Pacific Coast through this richly illustrated souvenir catalogue of the Museum’s Grand Hall. Discover ancient and contemporary works of Northwest Coast art found in every aspect of daily life from simple tools to the complex ceremonial regalia, masks and theatrical pieces created for public performance. Soaring totem poles and magnificent house front paintings draw attention to the vaulted ceiling and stunning architecture of the Grand Hall itself.

The Northwest Coast exhibition, developed in consultation and with the assistance of Northwest Coast First Nation artists, curators and scholars, reveals an extraordinary culture that has existed in Canada for thousands of years.

Du coq à l’âme

Du coq à l’âme
L’art populaire au Québec

By Jean-François Blanchette
February 2014, ISBN 978-2-7603-0814-5
Mercury Series, Cultural Studies 85
300 pp., 320 illustrations, 17 x 24 cm, paperback
$65 (French only)
Trade orders: University of Ottawa Press

 

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Folk art reflects both the perspectives of its producers and of society as a whole, resulting in work that ranges from formal and traditional to free-spirited and even eccentric. Whether created recently or decades ago, folk art is always expressive and authentic. Du coq à l’âme: L’art populaire au Québec is the product of many years of research by the author, including meetings with artists, collectors and fellow researchers, all passionate about this highly individual form of creativity.

Anthropologist Jean-François Blanchette takes a historical and visual approach to the collections of Quebec folk art at the Canadian Museum of History, including the prestigious Nettie Covey Sharpe Collection, acquired in 2002. Through photographs, interviews and original research, this book is designed to improve awareness of the cultural and social history of folk art, while showcasing the work of little-known Quebec artists. Du coq à l’âme seeks to define Quebec folk art, while also examining everything from its traditional forms, often centuries old, to its most recent and unbridled form of expression: graffiti.

Snow

Snow
By Bianca Gendreau
December 2013, ISBN 978-0-660-20278-5
112 pages, 64 images, 15 x 15 cm, paperback
$9.95 (also in French)
Includes money-saving coupons

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Snow. A source of passion, creativity and ingenuity — what would Canada be without it?

From the time of their arrival in North America, Europeans had to contend with snow, as had Aboriginal Peoples for centuries before them. Snow has always influenced the way we live and our ability to adapt — look no further than our constantly evolving winter sports. Snow is not only the muse of artists but also a driver of the economy. Featuring 300 artifacts, Snow presents a cultural history of this definitive northern precipitation.

This souvenir catalogue includes over 60 images – from epic snowstorms to satirical cartoons – that reveal how snow has shaped the Canadian identity. You’ll never look at winter the same way again.

First Peoples of Canada

First Peoples of Canada
Masterworks from the Canadian Museum of Civilization

By Jean-Luc Pilon and Nicholette Prince
With contributions from Ian Dyck, Andrea Laforet and Eldon Yellowhorn
Foreword by Douglas Cardinal
October 2013, ISBN 978-1-4426-2612-6
176 pp., 195 images, 23 x 28 cm, paperback
$49.95 (English only)
Limited-time discount price: $39.96
Trade orders: University of Toronto Press

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First Peoples of Canada offers readers a rare opportunity to experience a celebrated exhibition that has toured the world, yet has never been shown in Canada. This beautifully designed, full-colour book presents a collection of 150 archaeological and ethnographic objects produced by Canada’s First Peoples – including some that are roughly 12,000 years old – that represent spectacular expressions of creativity and ingenuity.

Curators Jean-Luc Pilon and Nicholette Prince sought out pieces held by the Canadian Museum of Civilization that could be considered “masterworks” based on their aesthetic qualities, symbolic value or the skills and raw materials used in manufacturing them. These unique and priceless artifacts embody the rich diversity of skills and materials used by Canadian Inuit, First Nations and Métis in both ancient and modern times.

First Peoples of Canada is full of insights not only on the pieces themselves, but also on the cultures that produced them and the geography of this vast land. Readers will come away from this book with a renewed appreciation of the lifestyles and achievements of Canada’s original inhabitants.

Jean-Luc Pilon is Curator of Ontario Archaeology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

Nicholette Prince is former Curator of Plateau Ethnology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, now working as an independent consultant.

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