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Marius Barbeau A glimpse of Canadian Culture (1883-1969)
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Textile working

Tracing wheel with a hollow metal handle which may have held replacement wheels at one time. (Canadian)

Two of six patterns for a bodice. They are made of heavy brown card and printed in black and are part of a method of pattern cutting developed by Mme Laura Leduc of Montreal. (Unknown)

Two of six patterns for a bodice. They are made of heavy brown card and printed in black and are part of a method of pattern cutting developed by Mme Laura Leduc of Montreal. (Unknown)

Needle made of oak wood, used for repairing fishing nets. (French Canadian)

Hackle for flax made of nails on a board of wood. Before spinning, the flax must be hackled and then combed. Hackling is the process of pulling the flax through a hackle, a comb-like instrument, to align the fibres. The flax is hackled through coarse combs and then through finer combs. (French Canadian)

Vertical wool winder. (French Canadian)

Wool winder with a base made from a carved log and 4 pegs for the wool. (French Canadian)

Loom bench with an unusual design of legs and cross piece. It was designed for a young girl just learning how to weave. (French Canadian)

Flax comb with a wide base and very long teeth which are probably made of ash wood. (French Canadian)

Heart-shaped embroidered scissor case made of tanned skin, pointed at one end and notched at other. The edges of the case are sewn with dyed blue and white moose hair. Flowers or grass are embroidered in green, blue, and white moose hair on front. (Huron-Wendat)

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