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Lord Stephen Taylor

Born in Marlow-on-Thames, England, Stephen Taylor (1910–1988) was a doctor, civil servant, politician and educator. In 1945, he entered politics as a Labour Member of Parliament, serving as Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Deputy Prime Minister, as well as Lord President of the Council. As a policy adviser during the creation of the National Health Service, Taylor’s policy experience and political acumen brought him international recognition. Taylor knew about Saskatchewan and the health policy goals of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) through a visit he made in 1946 when the CCF launched the Hospital Services Plan. He played a crucial role as negotiator between the provincial government and the doctors during the 1962 strike. Both sides accepted Taylor because both saw him as an expert neutral figure who understood their positions. Taylor stated that he thought the government’s medicare plan was good, but that the enabling legislation had been badly written and rushed. He was able to resolve the strike by winning concessions from both sides, and on July 23, 1962 an agreement was signed. Taylor’s role in resolving the Saskatchewan doctors’ strike paved the way for Saskatchewan to demonstrate medicare’s effectiveness to the other provinces.

Photo: Lord Stephen Taylor arrived from the United Kingdom on  July 17, 1962 to help the Saskatchewan government and the doctors  resolve their labour dispute.

Lord Stephen Taylor arrived from the United Kingdom on July 17, 1962 to help the Saskatchewan government and the doctors resolve their labour dispute.
University of Saskatchewan Archives, Thompson papers: Advisory Planning Committee on Medical Care – MG17S1, H. newspaper clippings, July 17, 1962



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    Date Created: March 31, 2010 | Last Updated: April 21, 2010