Citizens
Portraits of Canadian Women of African Descent
  CITIZENS...
  CURATOR'S
THOUGHTS
  PHOTOGRAPHER'S THOUGHTS
  TESTIMONIES
  RESOURCES-CREDITS
Christine Paré
Extrait sonore
My Friend
MY FRIEND

"The photograph of my friend who was assassinated. He is with me every day. This picture is always with me."

My Friend's Books
MY FRIEND'S BOOKS

"These books were given to me by my friend who wrote them and dedicated them to me. I will never lend these books."


A Letter from a Mother
A LETTER FROM A MOTHER

"A letter from the mother of my friend who was assassinated. A letter that conveys her affection for me.".


Christine Paré

It was a matter of impunity, of injustice, that made me leave my country.

I looked out the window and saw the first snowflakes fall. I went out with my umbrella to keep myself dry. I walked under my umbrella, but I saw that no one else had one. I wrote to friends: "It falls on us like flour, but it doesn't stay."

Remarks recorded during an interview.


Christine Paré was born in Côte d'Ivoire. After the death of her father, when she was three years old, the family moved to Burkina Faso. She studied computer science in Benin, then settled in Ouagadougou, in Burkina. The murder of her best friend drove her to immigrate to Quebec. "It was heart-rending. I left part of myself in Burkina: my close relatives, my family, my friends, my memories."

A Woman

A WOMAN

In August 2000, Christine arrived in Rouyn, in the region of Abitibi. She enrolled in Project Management at the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, but, feeling very isolated, decided to continue her studies in Montreal, in the same field. After earning her master's degree, she went to live in Calgary to improve her English. To pay for her courses, she found a job as Coordinator of resources for the City of Calgary. She would stay there 10 months. Today, while working for the Collectif des femmes immigrantes in Montreal, she plans to take courses in Community Services Administration at Concordia University. "I had the luck to be able to change careers. Even at age 65, one can still change." For Christine, to be an activist in human rights associations like the Comité Canada Norbert Zongo, named after a journalist in Burkina Faso who died for justice and liberty, remains very important. "To apprise Canadians of what is really happening in Burkina Faso. Whatever the country, when it is a matter of injustice, I am ready to commit myself and also be an activist with Canadians." Activism, studies, work, without forgetting the dream ... that of leaving again, one day, to work in Africa. "That continent gave birth to us, and it needs us," she says.


Toma
TOMA

My Graduation Day
MY GRADUATION DAY

Men for Freedom
MEN FOR FREEDOM

Carrying Memories.
CARRYING MEMORIES.

A Second Life
A SECOND LIFE

Travelling.
TRAVELLING.