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MenuSugar mapleWhite birchBush honeysucklePurple violet


Acer saccharum

Sugar maple

Sugar maple


Botanical Information

  • Deciduous tree, grows up to 30 m
  • Prefers rich rocky or hilly woods
  • Flowers bloom in the spring as the leaves unfold
  • Winged seeds released in the fall
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Points of Interest

  • National tree of Canada
  • Sap is the main source of maple syrup and maple sugar
  • Aboriginal peoples made tea from the inner bark to purify the blood, used the leaves to relieve itching and the sap for sore eyes
  • A sweet beverage was traditionally made from the sap
  • Wood can be used for furniture, flooring, plywood and other products
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Betula papyrifera

White birch

White birch


Botanical Information

  • Deciduous tree, grows up to 25 m
  • Prefers woods and rocky slopes
  • Male flowers and female catkins appear before leaves in early spring



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Points of Interest

  • Bark used by Aboriginal peoples to build canoes, as a waterproof layer on wigwams, and to make splints, spoons, dishes, artwork and baskets
  • Many medicinal uses by Aboriginal peoples, including remedies for skin problems, blood disease and burns
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Diervilla lonicera

Bush honeysuckle

Bush honeysuckle


Botanical Information

  • Deciduous shrub, grows up to 1.2 m
  • Prefers dry woods, clearings and rocky thickets
  • Pale yellow flowers bloom in the summer



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Points of Interest

  • Aboriginal peoples used roots in remedies for senility, urinary disorders and other ailments
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Viola cucullata

 Lavonia R. Stockelbach - Courtesy of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Purple violet


Botanical Information

  • Perennial herb, grows up to 15 cm
  • Prefers wet meadows and swampy ground
  • Blue-violet flowers bloom throughout the spring and summer



plazaicon.jpg
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Points of Interest

  • Adopted as the floral emblem of New Brunswick
    in 1936
  • Aboriginal peoples used leaves in a poultice to treat headaches
  • Leaves also traditionally infused to make a tea for colds and coughs
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