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MenuLeather-leafSheep laurelLabrador teaJack pine
Wild rosePitcher plant


Chamaedaphne calyculata

Leather-leaf

Leather-leaf


Botanical Information

  • Evergreen shrub, grows up to 1.5 m
  • Prefers peat bogs and margins of acid bogs
  • White flowers bloom from late spring to early summer



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Points of Interest

  • Aboriginal peoples made a tea from the leaves to treat fever
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Kalmia angustifolia

Sheep laurel

Sheep laurel


Botanical Information

  • Evergreen shrub, grows up to 1.5 m
  • Prefers sterile soil, old pastures and barrens
  • Deep pink flowers bloom in the spring



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Points of Interest

  • Tea taken sparingly by Aboriginal peoples to treat colds, backaches and stomach ailments
  • Can be used externally to treat pain, inflammation and headaches
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Ledum groenlandicum

Labrador tea

Labrador tea


Botanical Information

  • Evergreen shrub, grows up to 1 m
  • Prefers peaty soils, bogs
  • Small white flowers bloom throughout the spring and summer




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Points of Interest

  • Leaves widely used by Aboriginal peoples in tea to treat asthma, colds, stomach-aches, headaches and other ailments
  • Can be used externally for burns, rashes and insect stings
  • A brown dye can be made from the plant
  • Leaves can be used as a tobacco substitute
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Pinus banksiana

Jack pine

Jack pine


Botanical Information

  • Coniferous evergreen tree, grows
    up to 20 m
  • Prefers barren, sandy or rocky soil
  • Cones remain closed for many years, often until after a fire



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Points of Interest

  • Leaves and bark used medicinally by Aboriginal peoples in ointments and stimulants
  • Roots were used to sew canoe seams and bark roofs; seams were sealed with resin
  • Suitable for lumber and pulpwood
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Rosa acicularis

 Lavonia R. Stockelbach - Courtesy of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Wild rose


Botanical Information

  • Deciduous shrub, grows 1 to 2 m
  • Prefers thickets and rocky slopes
  • Pink flowers bloom in early summer
  • Hips appear in late summer





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Points of Interest

  • Adopted as the floral emblem of Alberta in 1930
  • Rich in vitamin C, rosehips can be used to make jelly and tea
  • Roots, leaves and bark used by Aboriginal peoples in remedies for eye and stomach problems
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Sarracenia purpurea

 Lavonia R. Stockelbach - Courtesy of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Pitcher plant


Botanical Information

  • Evergreen perennial herb, grows up to 1 m
  • Prefers bogs and peaty barrens
  • Purplish-red flower blooms throughout the spring and summer



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Points of Interest

  • Provincial floral emblem of Newfoundland (1954) and Labrador
  • Aboriginal peoples were the first to use the root to treat smallpox and other ailments
  • Pitcher-shaped leaves capture and digest insects
  • Leaf or root tea traditionally used to treat fever and chills, and ease childbirth
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