PETRA PETRA PETRA
Lost City of Stone
April 7, 2005 to February 18, 2007
The city of Petra in Jordan © Jane Taylor

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION 

PETRA AND THE NABATAEANS 

A WORD FROM THE CURATOR 

TIMELINE 

EXHIBITION TREASURES 

RESOURCES 

THE BEDOUIN OF PETRA 

CREDIT 
Statue of Victory holding celestial disk with head of Tyche

Statue of Victory
holding celestial disk
with head of Tyche

PETRA AND THE NABATAEANS

  THE CROSSROADS OF
   ANCIENT TRADE ROUTES


  A CITY CARVED IN STONE

  LOST… AND REDISCOVERED

From the first century B.C. to the third century A.D., Petra was one of the most influential and prosperous commercial centres in antiquity. This metropolis was literally carved from the red sandstone cliffs in the harsh desert of southern Jordan, yet amazingly, the city of 3,000 temples, tombs and dwellings was lost to Western knowledge for almost 600 years.

For much of its history, the city was governed by the Nabataeans, renowned for their great skills in trade, agriculture, engineering and architectural stone-carving. At its height, Petra was the centre of the Nabataeans’ commercial empire, which covers the lands of modern-day Jordan, Israel, Egypt, Syria and Saudi Arabia.